The BrownDaniel Team
Address 3060 Peachtree Road
Suite 100
Atlanta, Georgia 30305

Team Number: 770.630.5430
Main Office: 404.261.6300
Toll-Free Number: 877.480.2313
Fax: 404.261.6310

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Atlanta – Area Neighborhoods

It can be intimidating to move around the City of Atlanta given the vast nature of our large metro area, providing a plethora of options for where to live. There are many great advantages to living in the city of Atlanta include easy access to public transportation, proximity to cultural activities and attractions, a variety of restaurants and bars and close-knit communities with walkable town squares.

Whether your new residence is to be a single family home or a condominium please don’t let your neighborhood selection become confusing. Thankfully the BrownDaniel Team knows and understands them all very well and can seamlessly guide you to the right fit for your wants, needs and desires. Please call us today for any assistance with all of our wonderful Atlanta Neighborhoods.

Ansley Park is an affluent residential neighborhood located just east of Midtown and west of Piedmont Park. The area was developed by rail & real estate magnate Edwin P. Ansley between 1905-1908. The streets of the neighborhood were the first to be designed specifically for automobiles, with wide, winding roads, rather than the grid-like pattern required for streetcars. Ansley Park has been designated a Historic District by the National Register of Historic Places and remains a treasured neighborhood its residents are very proud to call home.

Neighborhood Website

The upper third of the city of Atlanta has plenty of small, wonderful, and occasionally diverse neighborhoods, but it’s pretty common to characterize the whole area as Buckhead. In 1938 Henry Irby purchased 202 ½ acres surrounding the present intersection of Peachtree, Roswell and West Paces Ferry roads $650. Irby established a general store and tavern at the northwest corner of this intersection. The name “Buckhead” comes from a story that Irby killed a large buck deer and placed the head in a prominent location; prior to this the area was called Irbyville. What was once a sleepy, aw-shucks hamlet has grown dramatically into Atlanta’s most well-to-do area, with impressive mansions, skyscrapers, world-class hotels, private schools, and THE destination for upscale shopping in Georgia and the region. Brookhaven, just outside the city limits to the northeast, recently incorporated into its own city of mostly very nice homes and new apartments.

Neighborhood Website

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Brookhaven is a city in the northeastern suburbs of Atlanta. It is in western DeKalb County, Georgia, United States, directly northeast of Atlanta. Incorporation officially took place on December 17, 2012, on which date municipal operations commenced. With a population of around 49,000, it is the largest city in DeKalb County. The new city stretches over 12 square miles with the Fulton County line on the west, I-85 on the south, Clairmont Road and the city of Chamblee at Chamblee Dunwoody Road on the east, and the city of Dunwoody at I-285 on the north. Neighborhoods within the City of Brookhaven include: Historic Brookhaven: the historic residential neighborhood from which the area derives its name. It has homes surrounding the Capital City Country Club, many designed by a number of well-known Atlanta architects of the pre-war period. Brookhaven Village: this is the name given to the urban town center that has emerged on Dresden Drive,The village is bordered by the residential neighborhoods of Ashford Park to the north and Drew Valley to the south, both offering single family homes within walking distance of the village. The village is home to commercial establishments, residences, and offices. Lynwood Park: In the last decade, residents seeking a new home in a close-in location have built crafstman-style homes, contributing to the overall improvement of the area’s infrastructure. The community is home to a large park, Lynwood Park, which features basketball courts, tennis courts, swimming pool, recreation center, playground and picnic area. Peachtree Road: Much of Brookhaven’s commercial developments are situated along Peachtree, including Town Brookhaven, a mixed-use district located adjacent to Oglethorpe University. North Brookhaven: Largely suburban in character, the area is home to various residential subdivisions; two large parks, Blackburn Park and Murphey Candler Park, and the Nancy Creek PATH trail;the historic Peachtree Golf Club, which was founded by Bobby Jones and designed by Robert Trent Jones;and top rated public and private schools. Lenox Park: Lenox Park is a former country club in the southwest corner of Brookhaven, re-purposed for residential and office uses.

Neighborhood Website

Chastain Park is an exclusive, upscale neighborhood built around the west side of a picturesque 268 acre park, Chastain Memorial Park, the largest city park in Atlanta. The park is named for Troy Green Chastain, a member of the Fulton County Commission from 1938-1942. This affluent neighborhood has many amenities lending to its appeal, to include: an amphitheater, home to many concerts & shows; arts center; ball fields & gymnasium; golf course; horse park; swimming pool; and many playgrounds and walking trails.

Neighborhood Website

The Dunwoody area is named for Major Charles Dunwody (1828-1905), and an extra “o” added with the incorrect spelling of his name on a banking note. On account of the railroad Dunwoody developed into a crossroads community, continuing to prosper even after the railroad shut down in 1921. The area remained rural until suburban residential development was initiated in the 1960’s. Dunwoody became incorporated as a city on December 1, 2008. Dunwoody Village is a neighborhood that lies in the historic heart of the community. The distinctive Colonial Williamsburg architecture of the district originated with the construction of Dunwoody Village Shopping Center in the 1970’s, from which the district gets its name. Perimeter Center is the neighborhood that has formed around the Perimeter Mall, which was developed in 1971, spurring major office, residential, and commercial developments. This is one of Atlanta’s largest job centers, employing hundreds of thousands of people. Dunwoody Transit Station provides public transit to the district. Georgetown is located near I-285 and borders with the city limits of Chamblee. One of the most walkable areas of the city, Georgetown contains both single-family residential subdivisions as well as its own retail district.

City of Dunwoody Website

Garden Hills is a Buckhead neighborhood located between Peachtree and Piedmont Roads, with Pharr Rd bordering it to the north and Lindbergh Dr. to the south. The neighborhood is a large, urban forest of winding streets with large trees and a pockets of parks throughout, convenient to shopping, schools and transportation. The homes are an eclectic range of Tudor, Georgian, Spanish Revival and Craftsman. At the center of it all is the Garden Hills pool, boasting a rustic 1930’s clubhouse, porch and large fireplace, host to community activities and available to rent for private functions.

Neighborhood Website

In the 1880s, developer and civil engineer Joel Hurt designed Inman Park as Atlanta’s first streetcar suburb. The neighborhood was a success, with residents taking the electric street car to downtown for work and returning to the urban oasis for relaxation. With the introduction of the automobile residents moved further north and Inman Park fell to blight. After years of decline in the middle of the 20th century, it’s now a beautiful tree-lined neighborhood just east of the BeltLine, with well-maintained parks scattered throughout the neighborhood. After decades of restoration Inman Park is once again a coveted neighborhood with many multi-million dollar properties, condos, and converted industrial buildings to mixed-use complexes of office and restaurant space.

Neighborhood Website

Midtown Atlanta really got humming in 1895 when Cotton States and International Exposition set up shop for 100 days in Piedmont Park. After a brief, intense hippy period in the 1960s and ‘70s, Midtown eventually grew into Atlanta’s second largest business district. New cranes, condos, and clubs seem to rise each day along the Peachtree Street corridor, while the eastern side of the neighborhood retains its historic neighborhood charm.

Neighborhood Website

Morningside is located north of Virginia Highland, east of Ansley Park & west of Druid Hills. In 1924 real estate agents James Smith & M.S. Rankin built eight homes in Morningside Park – the neighborhood was touted as “a new type of suburb”, advertising 70 foot wide paved streets allowing commuters to travel by streetcar or by car. The growing neighborhood acquired Morningside Elementary school in 1929, and Lenox Park opened in 1931 with homes designed by Atlanta architects Ivey and Crook. In 1934 the Morningside Civic League further beautified the area by planning crepe myrtles & dogwoods, which are still enjoyed today. In 1965 Morningside Lenox Park Associatin (MLPA) was incorporated to fight plans to build I-485 through the neighborhood. They banded together along with other neighborhoods to block the highway and, thanks to their pressure, the state dropped the plans in 1973. Throughout the neighborhood you will see markers, built to further define the Morningside/Lenox Park area and show their “pride of place”. This pride is still reflected by the residents of the area; this coupled with the great schools, location to shopping, parks & restaurants, all make this a highly sought-after intown residential neighborhood to live in.

Neighborhood Website

Martin Luther King, Jr. called the Old Fourth Ward home for much of his life. His birth home and his church, Ebenezer Baptist, are preserved at the south end of the neighborhood by the National Park Service. Historic Fourth Ward Park and Ponce City Market—the site of MailChimp’s new office—anchor the northeast corner of the neighborhood. In between, neighborhood leaders are trying to balance the needs of an historically underserved community with a sudden influx of investment in old houses, new apartments, and trendy restaurants and bars.

Neighborhood Website

Peachtree Hills is a cozy neighborhood in Buckhead which was developed in 1910 when the area was subdivided from farmland. The neighborhood is bordered by Peachtree Rd to the west, Lindbergh Dr to the north, and Peachtree Creek to the south. The homes of Peachtree Hills are eclectic with intimate gardens and large trees, and there are plenty of apartment living options as well. The neighborhood is within easy walking distance of major public transportation, and is close to recreation, restaurants and shopping. This cozy cottage neighborhood is a hidden gem in Buckhead.

Neighborhood Website

Peachtree Park is part of the Peachtree Highlands-Peachtree Park Historic District & is listed on the National Register of Historical Places. The district is significant for its architectural styles and for community planning and development; styles range from Colonial Revival, Craftsman, and English Vernacular revival. The neighborhood is also home to community parks & playgrounds. The greatest benefit of living is this neighborhood is its convenient location – it’s within easy walking distance to Lenox Square Mall & Phipps Plaza, two of the most upscale shopping centers in the state. Also within walking distance are some of the most popular restaurants in town, and access to many public transportation options, including two MARTA stations.

Neighborhood Website

Pine Hills is a neighborhood located on the eastern edge of Buckhead and is roughly bounded by Buford Hwy to the south, E Paces Ferry Rd. to the north, Lenox Rd to the west and E. Roxboro to the east. The neighborhood is bisected by the Fulton and Dekalb county line, putting the east and west sides of the neighborhood in different school districts. Pine Hills is a charming community of homes, to include European, traditional and ranch style homes, and is just minutes from the upscale shopping of Lenox & Phipps malls, popular restaurants, and public transportation.

Neighborhood Website

Sandy Springs became incorporated in December 2005 with a 94% vote in favor. The boundaries of Sandy Springs are Atlanta to the south, Cobb County to the west and north, Roswell to the north, and Dunwoody and Brookhaven to the east. Neighborhoods of Sandy Springs include Downtown: this is defined as the area aroundbounded by Abernathy Rd to the north, I-285 to the south, Sandy Springs Cir to the west, and Hildebrand Drive to the east is defined by the city and business groups as “Downtown Sandy Springs.” Northside Tower has served as an unofficial landmark for the center of the district since its completion in 1971. Downtown is also the site of the actual sandy springs that spurred the name of the city. Riverside: is the western district of the city and is a residential area marked by winding, hilly roads.Dunwoody Panhandle: The district’s name is derived from the fact that it is wedged between the river and Dunwoody, forming a geographic panhandle.The Dunwoody Pandhandle is a controversial area for the city, as it had been considered Dunwoody for many years.Perimeter Center: is a business district surrounding Perimeter Mall. About 40% of Perimeter Center is located in Dunwoody, with the western 60% located in Sandy Springs. North Springs North Springs is the large northernmost area of the city, and is generally defined as the area west of Georgia 400, east of Brandon Mill Rd and north of Abernathy Rd.and Sandy Springs ITP: A small portion extends inside the perimeter to the Atlanta city limit. Most of this area centers around scenic, mansion-filled single-lane roads.

Neighborhood Website

Lots in Virginia-Highland sold for just $19 in 1821. Near the turn of the 19th century, Atlanta’s streetcar system extended to the northeast, looping in Highland and Virginia Avenues. Subdivisions sprouted, immigrants from eastern Europe set up shop, and a neighborhood was born. After a protracted but ultimately successful fight against a proposed highway running through the neighborhood, Virginia-Highland emerged one of Atlanta’s most pleasant places to live, and one of the more popular spots for college students to drink beer. When they inevitably refer to the neighborhood as “the Highlands,” it’s okay to correct them.

Neighborhood Website